Mali suspended from international Francophone community over coup | AfriTV Online

When the Organization Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) removed the country from its membership Tuesday, the international community intensified pressure on the military junta that seized power in Mali. His leadership decided on the move at an un...

mali, international, relations, democracy

Mali suspended from international Francophone community over coup

Published by: O. Elijah
08/26/2020 08:42 PM

When the Organization Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) removed the country from its membership Tuesday, the international community intensified pressure on the military junta that seized power in Mali.

His leadership decided on the move at an unprecedented video conference session, adding that it would preserve some cooperation that would benefit the civilian population and bring about a transition to democracy.

 

The announcement came a day after West African bloc ECOWAS envoys and the new military rulers said they had failed to agree on a timetable for restoring Mali to democracy.

The OIF also called for the release of ousted president Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, who stepped down from power after the military coup last week and said he wanted to prevent bloodshed.

And they called for the establishment of "a transitional government led by a civilian authority" as soon as possible. The OIF said in the coming days it would send a high-level delegation to Mali.

 

The August 18 coup was already condemned by the international community, and ECOWAS expelled Mali from its ranks.

To date, ECOWAS has taken the lead in the international community in trying to negotiate with the country's new military leaders a timetable for a return to civilian rule.

Yet both sides said they had failed to come to an agreement on Monday — and also that Keita no longer wanted to be reinstated as president, which had been one of ECOWAS' initial demands.

Keita was elected in 2013 in a divided nation after running a campaign in which he portrayed himself as a unifying power.

He was re-elected for a second term in 2018 but struggled to make headway against the jihadists and further weakened an already sick economy by the ethnic unrest they sparked in the center of the world.

An uproar over the outcome of long delayed parliamentary elections in April cemented his unpopular status and a political movement was born in June to compel him to resign. 

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