Could Disinfection Tunnels Be a Problematic COVID-19 Invention? | AfriTV Online

Since the onset of the COVID19 pandemic, there have been multi-layered concerns by the government and experts from uncertainties of every country’s healthcare systems being overwhelmed, short of bed space, ventilators as well as being muscled out...

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Could Disinfection Tunnels Be a Problematic COVID-19 Invention?

Published by: Tobiloba Chelsea
07/01/2020 10:08 PM

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been multi-layered concerns by the government and experts, from uncertainties of every country’s healthcare systems being overwhelmed, short of bed space, ventilators as well as being muscled out of essential virus supplies. 

 

Alongside the government, citizens, and expert concerns, there are fears about how fast the virus could spread and affect billions and claim thousands of lives. According to the world health organization (WHO), an estimated 30 to 50 million people could be affected by the pandemic. 

 

One great piece of invention that gained the attention of the African continent is the “Disinfection Tunnels”. Their invention as well as application spread rapidly, and is currently used in several parts of Africa, in both private and public facilities. 

 

 

The disinfection tunnels are used as a preventive measure for every individual that walks through the tunnel. University of Osun (UNIOSUN), located in the South-Western part of Nigeria, wasted no time in producing and employing this innovation. According to the university, its mechanical sanitizing cubicle, as they call it was a contributing factor in the combat against the virus. 

 

 

However, this invention comes with several challenges one of which is the use of chemical disinfection sprays. Another challenge is that the tunnel exposes individuals to ultra-violet rays.  

 

These chemicals could be deadly, having an adverse effect on other parts of the body. Experts stressed that the spraying of human beings with chemicals could be dangerous, stating, “Disinfectants were designed for use on hard surfaces”. 

 

According to reports from Africa CDC, no evidence shows that the use of disinfectant tunnels or spraying of human beings with chemicals minimizes the transmission rate of any form of infectious disease including COVID-19. 

 

 

 

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